Why You Should Continue Your Education in Access Control Power

IF YOU’RE READING THIS PUBLICATION, CHANCES ARE YOU’RE EITHER A DHI MEMBER OR SOMEONE ALIGNED WITH OR WORKING IN THE CONTRACT HARDWARE INDUSTRY. YOU ARE RELIED UPON FOR YOUR EXPERTISE IN THE TECHNICAL APPLICATION OF ARCHITECTURAL DOORS AND HARDWARE PRODUCTS AS WELL AS BUILDING, FIRE, AND LIFE SAFETY CODES TO DOOR OPENINGS. CONTINUOUS EDUCATION ON...
Why You Should Continue Your Education In Access Control Power

IF YOU’RE READING THIS PUBLICATION, CHANCES ARE YOU’RE EITHER A DHI MEMBER OR SOMEONE ALIGNED WITH OR WORKING IN THE CONTRACT HARDWARE INDUSTRY. YOU ARE RELIED UPON FOR YOUR EXPERTISE IN THE TECHNICAL APPLICATION OF ARCHITECTURAL DOORS AND HARDWARE PRODUCTS AS WELL AS BUILDING, FIRE, AND LIFE SAFETY CODES TO DOOR OPENINGS. CONTINUOUS EDUCATION ON PRODUCTS, CODES AND TRENDS IS PART OF WHAT HELPS YOU MAINTAIN YOUR HIGH LEVEL OF EXPERTISE.

When it comes to access control systems, the learning curve is steep and fast. Also, when it comes to wiring, many door security and safety professionals are not the ones running wires from the power supply to the electrified hardware and exit devices. After all, you did not install the power supply – you just supplied the material.

You may even rely on the power supply provided by an access control supplier. Yet, when there is a power issue, it usually occurs at the door – your door – with some sort of malfunction. So, who gets the call when the device doesn’t work? You do, of course.

Once you get the call about a malfunctioning device, who do you call? The manufacturer! As a manufacturer of electrified hardware and access control devices, what do you think we do in our decision tree of troubleshooting questions to solve your problem?

Invariably – unless there is an obvious problem with the device – we start with power questions. Why? Because we have learned and documented over many decades of technical support calls that 75 to 85 percent of access control operating problems and technical support calls are due to power issues, not the device.

The quality and reliability of electrified hardware brands in today’s industry is very high. And unless it was improperly installed or damaged during installation, the device is probably not the problem.

Avoiding costly callbacks and damage to your reputation is important to everyone. Maintaining fundamental knowledge of access control power is key. You’ll find there is always something new to learn, or a special tip to apply that will make all the difference on your door opening project. We’ve learned that with basic access control power skills, you can immediately address possible conflicts between what was designed versus what was installed, repaired or upgraded for most access control projects.

Industry associations like DHI, and manufacturers, have a wealth of information, tools and training to assist you un your electrified door control endeavors. Depending on your need and comfort level with access control power, visit the Education section of the DHI website (www.dhi.org), where you can learn more about courses such as:

COR133 – Electrified Architectural Hardware

EHC400 – Electrified Hardware Applications and Documentation

EHC433 – Advanced Electrified Architectural Hardware

CE1503 – Intermediate Electrified Access Control (a micro-learning course)

We Want to Hear from You! Have something on your mind that you want to share with Door Security + Safety readers? Email arickard@dhi.org, to author a future Closing Thoughts column.

October 2019 Door Security + Safety Magazine

Source: www.sdcsecurity.expert